NEW PIECE – “Colossus”

by Kenley

Hi everybody,

So, it’s been a big year.  In the last eight months, my family grew by one and I took a one-year sabbatical from teaching to pursue a Master’s degree in Composition from Brandon University.  I know, perhaps we could have timed that better but, as the old saying goes, “the right time is when it happens,” right?

Anyway, I’ve certainly learned a lot this year (from both experiences above) and I’m ready to share my second semester piece for concert band, “Colossus.” It’s a Level 5 piece–my first one–and it’s a programmatic tale about the dangers of human hubris… oh, and hunting a giant.

Giants are in folklore and media from across the world, though I’ve long been fascinated with the creatures who protect (rather than attack) humankind; the gryphon is one such creature, but what if it were a giant? Something like humans, but bigger? My first thought is that humanity would rather protect itself and that there would be great honour to whomever slayed the giant (because we are arrogant and often don’t trust what is there to protect us, right?).  However, even more provocative questions are “who will protect you when the giant is gone? And what were they protecting you from that you never even saw? And was removing your guardian even a good idea?” And my favourite one: “What happens now?”

(And if you think that humanity doesn’t behave that way, look no further than Brexit).

Video-Game-Shadow-of-the-Colossus-37265

You might also be thinking that this sounds a whole lot like the plot to Team Ico’s 2005 release Shadow of the Colossus for PlayStation 2 and you’d be right. In fact, there’s a great big quote for you about two-thirds of the way in.  I drew a lot of inspiration from the game’s narrative (including the piece’s title), but especially from the music.  I studied Gus Tredwell’s (The Slow Pianist on YouTube) piano transcriptions and looked at how all of that music was put together.  The title Colossus implies a Greek sensibility, as opposed to “giant” or “jotun” or something, so all of that is in there.

Even the structure has a Shadow of the Colossus element to it: It starts strong, but there is a long slow build as the giantslayer traverses the landscape, gradually growing in intensity as the colossus gets clearer into view, despite still being far away.  When the battle finally engages (with the band restating the opening motive), the music is dark and dramatic until the hero takes the upper hand, when it gets epic and victorious.  That last section, however, is very short and where we expect a triumphant ending, we get an unsettled ending, as though we may have done something we shouldn’t have.

Musically, I’m pretty outside of my comfort zone here.  There’s a lot of diminished and augmented harmony in the first half as dissonances stack through the band.  The second half of the piece is quite chromatic over pedal tones, so the different sections feel more like key areas and less like harmonic motion from chord to chord (slow harmonic motion is something I really worked on throughout the piece).

So, I hope you enjoy it and, if you want to play it, send me a note (in the “Contact” field) and let me know!

-K

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